Iraqi Journal of Medical Sciences








Vol. 11 Issue 4 October - December / 2013
Published on website | Date : 2016-03-29 11:01:22

EFFECTS OF TRANEXAMIC ACID ADDITION ON ELASTICITY AND TENSION OF THE FIBRIN GLUE

Ibrahem A Mahmood, Fakhir S Al-Ani


Abstract

Background:Fibrin glue is a natural, biocompatible and biodegradable topical tissue adhesive that initiates and duplicates the final stages of coagulation cascade. To prevent early fibrinolysis, antifibrinolytic agent may be added to the components of the glue. Tranexamic acid is a synthetic antifibrinolytic lysine analogue that competitively inhibits the activation of plasminogen to plasmin, hence, delays the fibrinolysis activation.
Objective:To synthesize of the fibrin glue with and without tranexamic acid addition and explore the biomechanical behavior of both formulae with regard to stretching (elasticity) and tension.
Methods: Using thrombin and cryoprecipitate (as a source of fibrinogen) for synthesis of the "ordinary fibrin glue". In another preparation; Tranexamic acid was added to both components (thrombin and cryoprecipitate) for synthesis of the "tranexamic acid added fibrin glue". Then, by using displacement and force transducers we measure elasticity and tension of the synthesized fibrin glue (both ordinary and tranexamic acid added fibrin glue) at different durations.
Results: Tranexamic acid addition to the fibrin glue causes significantly higher elasticity results at 1 hour, 1 week durations. Significant lower tension results are witnessed at 1 hour duration, while at 1 week duration, comparison of the tension results of both ordinary and tranexamic acid added fibrin glue show no significant difference.
Conclusion: Tranexamic acid addition led to change in biological behavior of the glue presents as increase in its elasticity and decreased tension. This change should be taken into consideration when the applicator needs to use this formula in the management of different areas of human body.
Keywords:Fibrin glue, tranexamic acid, elasticity, tension.


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